Articles

Anxiety & Trauma

Cognitive Therapy

Childhood Anxiety

Index

Marijuana

Take Back the Power

Self Esteem

Self Acceptance

Thought

 

 

Main Menu

Home

Newsletter

Book Store

Telephone Counselling

Anxiety Disorders

Articles

Meditation

Mindfulness

Self Help

FAQs

Contact

Links

Research

From our Book Store

Special Deal One

The Best Selling book 'Power Over Panic'

Third Edition

 

Power Over Panic Best Selling Book

by Bronwyn Fox

 

and

Take Back the Power

A Double CD set featuring Meditation and Mindfulness

Taking Back the Power Double CD set

with Bronwyn Fox

 

 

Take Back the Power !
Many people who have an anxiety disorder can find it difficult in recognising and / or accepting their realistic fears and anxiety. As people blame themselves for their anxiety disorder, they also blame themselves for feeling realistic fears and anxiety.

Articles Anxiety : A Normal Response to Trauma

Fear, panic and anxiety have no borders. Feelings of fear and anxiety, a sense of helplessness, vulnerability, along with feelings of profound grief, sadness and anger are normal responses for people who have been involved in some way in a life threatening situation. including being caught up in a terrorist attack, or a war zone.
See Part Two.

With terrorist attacks and the ongoing threats, plus the ongoing violence in the world, people everywhere can also feel fear and anxiety as a result, even though they may not be directly involved. People can also feel a sense of helplessness, vulnerability, anger and sadness. Again, this fear, anxiety and the associated feelings are natural, realistic responses.

This is opposed to our anxiety disorder fears, where we think our panic attacks or anxiety will harm us in some way, eg thinking we may have a heart attack, or go insane, or lose control in some way. While we feel a threat to our well being from our panic and anxiety, these fears are not realistic. No matter how much it can feel like it, people with an anxiety disorder do not die or go insane or lose control as a result of their panic and anxiety.

Many people who have an anxiety disorder can find it difficult in recognising and / or accepting their realistic fears and anxiety. As people blame themselves for their anxiety disorder, they also blame themselves for feeling realistic fears and anxiety. They think they 'should not' feel this way, or that 'they should just pull themselves together, or that they should be 'strong' and not be 'weak'.

In an attempt to overcome these realistic feelings, people will fight against them. This has the potential to create more anxiety and feelings of helplessness because it is denying a natural response to traumatic event/s. Part of the overall recovery process from an anxiety disorder is learning to separate realistic fears and anxiety, from those of our anxiety disorder fears and anxiety. It also means allowing ourselves to feel these feelings and not fight against them. Allowing ourselves to feel these feelings enables us to move forward, rather than becoming stuck in ever increasing anxiety circles.

One major characteristic of people who have an anxiety disorder, is the fear of expressing primary emotions. Most people in this category suppress their feelings of anger and sadness. Again people feel that they 'should not feel this way', or that they are 'not being strong', or that their anger and feelings of grief are 'bad' or 'wrong'. Part of the recovery process, not just from an anxiety disorder, but from major trauma, does mean allowing ourselves to feel the full extent of our emotions. Appropriate expression of these emotions is healthy.

Suppression of our anger and sadness leads to increased feelings of anxiety, depression and helplessness because we are denying the very emotions that will help us work through the experience.

With the ongoing tensions and major traumatic events occurring in the world today,while we may feel helpless about them, we can do much to help ourselves. We can take a proactive response to minimise or prevent the development of an anxiety disorder, or, to minimise or prevent any escalation of an established anxiety disorder. This includes allowing ourselves to feel realistic fears and anxiety, allowing ourselves to feel our primary emotions such as anger and grief. It means allowing ourselves to feel what we are feeling without becoming caught up in thinking that we 'should not be feeling this way, and/or that these feelings are 'bad' or 'wrong'. Or that we 'should just get over it.

It also means allowing ourselves to feel the way we are, and not becoming obsessed with thoughts of what the future may hold, These thoughts can include 'how safe are we; what could happen; what may happen; how would it happen etc'. While these thoughts are very normal in response to traumatic events, we can also be proactive in this, and not allow these thoughts to become obsessive. We can learn to take each day as it comes and deal with each day as it is, without projecting our fears into it, or into the future.

We need to keep our normal routine, and get on with our lives. Getting on with our lives does not mean that our feelings of anxiety, fear, anger and grief will diminish within a few seconds, hours or days. It means that we get on with our lives feeling these feelings and working with them.Easier said than done ? It may seem so, but it is in the doing, rather than the worrying and obsessing, that will provide us with relief in the long term.